Dries Van Noten Paris
Number 7, Quai Malaquais was formerly an historic antique bookshop standing between rue Bonaparte and rue de Seine, close to the Académie Française, and the Académie des Beaux-Arts de Paris.

It embodies all the charms of the Left Bank with splendid views on the Louvre, the Seine and its bookstalls. The neighbourhood is primarily known for its art galleries and antiques dealers. The spirit of the space is a Parisian embodiment of the Dries Van Noten ethos and passion in its respect for traditions and ancestral crafts, discretion, and authenticity.
Opened in 2007, the womenswear boutique has been designed like an apartment with its library with balustrade, drawing room, conservatory and a dressing room styled as an empire era boudoir in rich yellow silk.
Standing out at only few doors away, Number 9, Quai Malaquais offers the menswear collection. It has been for 30 years a gallery for African primitive art that is overlooked the Seine from Paris’ left bank.
Each original piece of furniture, "objet trouvé" and decorative feature has been carefully sourced by Mr Van Noten from salesrooms and antiques dealers in Belgium and across Europe. Opened in 2009, this specific yet diversified world expresses once more Mr Van Noten’s established love of shops as “cabinets de curiosités”.
Dries Van Noten, Quai Malaquais, Paris
Number 7, Quai Malaquais was formerly an historic antique bookshop standing between rue Bonaparte and rue de Seine, close to the Académie Française, and the Académie des Beaux-Arts de Paris.

It embodies all the charms of the Left Bank with splendid views on the Louvre, the Seine and its bookstalls. The neighbourhood is primarily known for its art galleries and antiques dealers. The spirit of the space is a Parisian embodiment of the Dries Van Noten ethos and passion in its respect for traditions and ancestral crafts, discretion, and authenticity.
Opened in 2007, the boutique has been designed like an apartment with its library with balustrade, drawing room, conservatory and a dressing room styled as an empire era boudoir in rich yellow silk.

Lighting plays a crucial role in shaping the intimate atmosphere. A 1920s Venetian chandelier that once dominated the lobby of a Roman hotel. Two large theatre spotlights lend a cinematic feel to the space
Standing out at only few doors away, Number 9, Quai Malaquais offers the menswear collection. It has been for 30 years a gallery for African primitive art that is overlooked the Seine from Paris’ left bank.
Each original piece of furniture, "objet trouvé" and decorative feature has been carefully sourced by Mr Van Noten from salesrooms and antiques dealers in Belgium and across Europe. Opened in 2009, this specific yet diversified world expresses once more Mr Van Noten’s established love of shops as “cabinets de curiosités”.